Archive for the 'ebay' Category

Why do you shop online?

A news tidbit offered up some interesting numbers about Canadian shoppers.
Online shopping up to $15 billion (almost $13 billion in 2007)
The number of orders are up since 2007. (95 million from 70 million)
Men more likely to buy something online than women (42% compared to 37%).
Most common product being travel services.

So why do you shop online?
I do it mostly out of convenience. When I’m at work and I want to buy something I can do it by a click of a button. Biggest complaints about in store shopping: store stock, lineups, the people, and parking. Nothing is worse than driving to the mall to buy something on sale only to see that “out of stock” sign. Then I feel obligated to buy something to ensure that the whole trip was not a waste. Who likes coming home empty handed?

Lineups suck, plain and simple. Nobody likes to be stuck behind the chatty senior, or the lady shopping for a family of 12 and two shopping carts, or in the so called “express lane” where the cashier is waiting for a price check on an item. Lines suck.

People suck too. I’m talking about the rude, smelly, fat, talking loudly on your cell phone losers who you’re grouped together with all looking for that item on sale. Doesn’t it suck too when they get the last one just ahead of you? GGrrrrr.

OMG, over there, the holy grail of parking! Oh wait, that’s a handicapped zone. *sigh, keep circling. End up following someone to their car, only to have them take 10 minutes to buckle their seatbelt, and fix their hair, before even starting the car. Then you park, rush in to buy your item, find out it’s out of stock, get back to your car to see your car door dented because of the idiot who parked next to you. Who designs these parking spots to be so small in the first place?!

Free shipping almost always seals the deal for me. If you can offer me delivery to my door at no extra cost I am more likely to buy stuff from your website, even if it’s not on sale.

Let the auctions continue

A judge ruled in favor of eBay during a lawsuit launched by Tiffany’s. The jewelry maker charged that eBay knowingly advertised fakes as genuine Tiffany products harming their image. The judge ruled that Tiffany’s did not adequately prove their case. eBay did admit it knew some of the auctions listed were not genuine products but at the same time they simply provide the buyers and sellers a place make transactions and does not confirm authenticity. Other Internet companies are breathing a sigh of relief as this is viewed as a precedent providing some immunity from being sued for trademark infringement.

I find it hard to believe that many people have been fooled when buying some jewelry off of eBay at a fraction of the price AND assuming that it is indeed a genuine brand name product. If the deal is too good to be true, it probably is a fake. Also, if the seller is located in Asia, it is DEFINITELY a fake. Anyways, let the auctions continue! Let stolen products and fakes alike be sold to unsuspecting buyers on eBay!

More servers, more problems

Most big companies with cash to spare, spend it to solve typical technological problems. Slow system performance? Upgrade, buy more servers, new hardware, or more bandwidth. Not often do you see companies invest in analyzing existing hardware performance and tweaking their systems. Take for example eBay. eBay handles an enormous amount of data through many, many auctions running 24/7. Sure, with the amount of money eBay is rolling in, it would be easy to buy a few more servers to accommodate people trying to hawk their stolen goods. Rather than doing that eBay took an innovative approach by analyzing the analytic data, finding bottlenecks and improving server efficiency. How’s that for a big company.

Now if only they would share some of those secrets with say … Google? Maybe searches could get even faster (if that’s possible) but also minimize future technology pollution going forward. You gotta think that 5 years from now Google and eBay and other technology companies create a lot of technology waste. Going green would help all of us.

Uh oh, maybe there’s something this economy thing

Banks are going under left and right but the technology sector is immune … right? Money automatically flows towards technology companies in good times and bad … right? What’s this? eBay is cutting 1,000 jobs? Uh oh. And they’re going to take a $70 – 80 million charge for restructuring?! This could be trouble. When one of the big boys has to cut jobs things must be on a downswing. The auction game has been in bit of a flux lately. If you noticed eBay cut seller fees a few months ago and I’ve noticed the seller promotions have increased. For eBay things were already on a downswing.

Now if Google has to cut jobs … we’re all in trouble.

Computer sold on eBay for $65 contained private data

In the company’s defence, the employee was probably “former” and “disgruntled”. Who sells corporate hardware without authorization?! You’d think after previous debacles of data loss and personal information issues banks would pay more attention to this kind of security leak. I’m just happy I don’t bank with them.

“American Express and NatWest/RBS said they were investigating, but would need to establish how many clients were involved before deciding on a course of action. Graphic Data said it was trying to recover the computer. (link)

Paypal: Safari is not safe, stop using it

While current browser share estimates for Apple’s Safari web browser hover somewhere in the 4.5 percent range, Safari is attracting some unwanted attention from PayPal, the eBay-owned payment company. PayPal is urging its users to ditch Safari and instead use alternative browsers such as Internet Explorer 7, IE 8, Firefox 2, Firefox 3, or even Opera.

The reason for the warning is Safari’s lack of anti-phishing technology. Currently the Apple browser does not alert users to sites that could be phishing for your info, and it lacks support for Extended Validation. PayPal is, of course, a popular site among phishers in their neverending search for personal information, user IDs, and passwords. (link)


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 29 other followers

Technorati – Blog Search

Add to Technorati Favorites

submit express