Posts Tagged '3g'

iPads landing in Canada

Apple’s set to strengthen their grip on Canadians with the release of the iPad on May 28th. For just a few dollars (or a kidney) you can own this magical device that even grandma can use. Touchscreen (no usb), WiFi (no memory expansion), access to thousands of apps (only thru iTunes), 10 hours of battery life (battery not replaceable), and the envy of everyone else at the coffee shop (jerk).

Another bit of news is that Rogers Wireless has released pricing info for the 3G version as well.

$15 gets you 250MB
$35 for 5GB
or piggyback off of your existing cell phone plan for $20

Just you get an idea of what pricing for the actual iPad 3G looks like … $779 for the 32GB version. $549 for the 16GB non 3G version. Ah, the price of becoming a member of the Scientology Apple brotherhood.

(link)

If you’re still on the fence perhaps some expert reviews may help you decide.
iPad Review

Iphone users sucking up all the 3G?

An interesting article here points out some very interesting numbers about the iPhone, their users, and the drain on AT&T’s 3G network. Which makes me wonder whether this whole idea of iPhone exclusivity was a detriment to the service provider. On the one hand you’re revenue stream is almost guaranteed for the next few years. On the other hand it’s also a guarantee that your 3G service will be limited, expect service outages. It’s no secret the many disgruntled iPhone users in the U.S. are unhappy with AT&T. But how much of that is to be blamed on the network and how much is to be blamed on the user? Is it unreasonable that the average iPhone user suck up 10 times the 3G bandwidth than the average 3G subscriber?

Perhaps it’s time to lay off the tweets, hmm? You don’t NEED to check your email every 5 minutes. The 3G pipe intended to serve all users has been used up by thirsty iPhone users. The other argument could be made that AT&T was not prepared for the deal it made with Apple and that the pipe should be bigger to begin with. However that takes a whole lot of money invested in infrastructure. Money which AT&T has been slow to recoup from 3G data plans. Plus Apple getting cut as well doesn’t help.

Spreading out the load over several service providers might make a difference but it still does not solve the excessive 3G usage problem. Just save some 3G for me will ya?

Review: SciPhone i9++ (iPhone clone)

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Wow, I can’t believe people still hit up this old post. Anyways it would appear that nobody searches the comments for answers so here’s a quick rundown of the most commonly posted questions/problems.

Review Sciphone i9++ (more)

Dual sims – yes, you can have both active at the same time. Not sure how it works if you receive 2 calls at the same time though. 3G sims will work but you won’t get 3G speed.

Memory – the max is 2GB, however newer versions/firmware may support larger sizes. Mine only takes 2GB and it’s a Kingston brand so I can confirm that is compatible.

Transferring files to your phone – plug in the phone to your pc, when the dialogue box pops up on your phone select “mass storage”, it should pop up on your computer as 2 new drives. Select the larger of the 2 and copy your data over. It might take you a few tries to get the right folder for the appropriate media files. I’m not going to tell you where what files go where, you should be able to figure it out on your own. The other option is bluetooth adapter. I’ve tried it, it works, stuff gets dumped into the bluetooth folder (received files or something like that).

Vibration – settings> user profiles> customize> alert type. If you don’t want your phone to vibrate or ring at all (ie. silent mode) set the alert type to ring, then change the volume down the lowest setting.

Pricing – I’ve seen them as low as $40 US lately.

Apps – you cannot download apps. A handful of java games will work but not many. Plus the ones that you do get to work will run very slowly. It is not compatible with iTunes.

SMS/MMS/Internet – it doesn’t work out of the box. You will need to configure your SMS/MMS/Internet settings yourself based on your service provider.

Video files – need to be down sampled to 176×144 in mp4 or 3gp format. A 1 hour show should be about 60MB.

Quality issues – there are many unofficial manufacturers of the SciPhone i9++ so don’t be surprised if you get a dud. There are already quality issues with the phone to begin with. Let’s face it, you are the owner of a fake Chinese clone of an iPhone. Do not expect it have the same build quality, features, performance of a name brand product. Many of the people that post here are mistaken in believing they are getting a true iPhone clone when in fact they simply buying a phone that LOOKS like an iPhone. Remember, there’s a difference between talking the talk and walking the walk. This phone does neither well. I bought the phone out of interest, this is in no way my main phone, nor did I rely on this phone for extended use. (I currently use a Nokia E71). While it does provide some usability, it really is a novelty product. In the end, you get what you pay for.

I will continue to approve comments but I have not been responding to inquiries.

How to turn off vibration for i9++ i68

*The Original Post*

I know what you’re thinking. WHY? Just get the real thing! Well for one the data plan is a big barrier for the average user. Up here in Canada the minimum iPhone plan will run you $60/month on top of the 3 year contract and the purchase of the phone itself ($199). So if you could buy a fake at a fraction of the cost ($99USD from eBay) and avoid the whole data plan wouldn’t you at least investigate it?

So here it is: the SciPhone i9++ unlocked GSM quadband (850/900/1800/1900 Mhz) 3.2″ touch screen mp3 video java bluetooth gprs fm radio 1.3mp camera video recording.

sciphone002Marketed as i9+ or i68+ or 3G i9++ (no 3G functionality). There are many sellers on eBay. Judging by the box, you think you’re buying a real iPhone (but of course you’d be wrong). Probably not a good idea to buy one of these if you’re vacationing in China. Don’t get fooled by those shady street vendors. Even the box shows “AT&T” in the picture and Safari as the browser, just looks good to me.

sciphone003Open up the box and still looks good so far. The packaging is nicely sealed and indeed it does look like an actual phone and not a brick inside. Looks like everything is here. 2 batteries (3.7v, 1000mAH, lithium ion), charger, USB cable, micro SD adapter, and wired headset. Each neatly wrapped up in their individual plastic bags.

sciphone004Hey look! It’s actually charging! This is a good sign. Perhaps the phone may even actually make calls. (photo is washed out due to the crappy flash, hey, it’s an old Fujitsu camera, that’s what was available at the office).

sciphone005The manual was essentially useless. Here’s an exaggerated sampling “SMS: to SMS type an SMS” or perhaps “To make phone call, press phone icon, and type in number”. Forget putting in important details such as setting up your SMS or MMS settings or video file resolution playback, or which folders to put what files in. Instead you’re left to figure that out all on your own.

I’m just going to put a bunch of pictures here. Yes, that does say “Phone” and “16GB” (no it isn’t actually 16GB, supposedly the limit is 8GB).

sciphone006sciphone007sciphone008sciphone010

Inside it has the badging “SciPhone i9++”, quadband, standard serial number and IMEI number. Spot for the micro SD card on the right and 2 SIM slots on the left. Stylus, yes, a stylus. It comes in handy sometimes, but it’s a bit too small for my liking. The tip tends to dig into the “webbing” between my thumb and finger when I hold it. The back plastic piece takes a bit of patience to get off the first time. Because it is so flimsy you don’t want to risk breaking it by being too forceful. It’s not a big deal after you’ve done it a few times (THATS WHAT SHE SAID! *budda-boom!)

sciphone009sciphone011sciphone013

The touch functionality is good. The interface is not as quick as the real iPhone. Flow page navigation is easy with the thumb (up to 5 pages I believe, we’ll see after I install all of my java games). Compared to the CECT P168 and the previous SciPhone i9 the screen is better and the camera is better. The P168 is still king when it comes to reception. You will find reception to occassionally jump around with the SciPhone i9++. Call quality is above average. Hey, it’s even got speaker phone.

Bluetooth didn’t seem to work initially. I tried connecting my headset and it didn’t work on the first try. Powered it off and tried again and it detected instantly.

The volume is loud. Make sure you have your thumb on the volume tab when you get that first call. And for God’s sake change the default ringtone! Load that thing up with your mp3s stat!

You can’t change the default screen saver (at least I haven’t figured out how to) but you can switch between the basic ones. When you’ve got the lock screen up, give the phone a shake to the left or right (yes, it supports the shake feature, also during mp3 playback) to switch pictures. I like the stones one myself, something peaceful about those smooth rocks.

Overall it seems like a bargain for $99 USD. Anything more and it’s probably not worth it. I’ve only had it for less than a week but I’m pretty happy with it so far. I’m still trying to set up the GPRS to do some web surfing but that’s not a big deal for me since I’m not spending my time doing Twitter or Facebook updates. The stylus is really handy for texting since my fat fingers often press the wrong letter. Down convertering video files to 3GP is annoying but certainly helps pass the time when you’re sitting at the doctor’s office waiting. Also the video does auto rotate to both sides depending on which way you turn the phone.

Bottom line is: you could do worse. It’s a very good fake iPhone. Even fooled some of my friends after they picked it up and played with it. They found it to be a bit lighter but couldn’t quite figure out why this iPhone was different. Also you need to remember what you’re buying. It’s a iPhone clone, a fake, made in China, most likely from some shady dropshipper. I wouldn’t be surprised if it stopped working after 6 months. Make sure you get the right one. There are many models and believe it or not. There are actually clones of these clones. People making cheaper copies of these phones from left over parts! Probably why you hear horror stories from some people who bought this phone and how it sucks. They probably got a fake SciPhone or fake P168.

*Also don’t buy this phone if you’re big into texting. A touch screen phone is not meant for a great texting experience!

Update: July 27, 2009

ATTENTION: CHECK THE FORUMS! I’M TIRED OF ANSWERING THE SAME QUESTIONS OVER AND OVER AGAIN. PLEASE READ THE COMMENTS, THEN CHECK THE FORUMS AND SEARCH FOR AN ANSWER

http://www.mysciphone.com/English_Sciphone_Forum/index.php

Update: May 7, 2009
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Gadget: 3G MiFi

3G connectivity can sometimes be hard to find and when you find it sometimes you wanna share it. This gadget from Novatel Wireless might be for you. It’s 3G, it’s a router, it’s wireless, plus it in a cute little tiny shell. What more could you ask for. Oh and it’s probably gonna cost around $200 …

Supports VPN, email syncing, and plenty of 3G/WiFi Internet access. Get your hands on a MiFi to match your iPhone when it comes out next year.

Unhappy with the 3G iPhone’s performance? sue

We all knew it was coming, it was just a matter of time. A lawsuit has been filed against Apple over what the plaintiff is referring to as the “Defective iPhone 3G,” which she hopes will become a class-action complaint. Alabama resident Jessica Alena Smith filed the complaint yesterday against the iPhone maker, alleging that the new iPhone’s 3G performance and reliability has been subpar, despite the claims made by Apple’s aggressive marketing campaign. Considering that a true fix has yet to be issued for users’ 3G problems, this could just be the tip of the iPhone lawsuit iceberg.

Smith purchased her new iPhone 3G sometime after it went on sale on July 11, after being bombarded with ads on TV, radio, and print about the device. “One could barely turn on the television without hearing that the new iPhone 3G was ‘twice as fast for half the price,'” reads the complaint. Immediately after the purchase, however, Smith noticed that the iPhone’s data connection, e-mail, SMS, and other communications were slower than expected, and that the device only appeared to connect to AT&T’s 3G network less than 25 percent of the time. She also experienced an “inordinate amount of dropped calls,” according to the lawsuit. (link)

Faulty chips behind poor 3G iPhone reception?

And let the finger pointing begin. Apple points to the chip maker and the chip maker points to Apple’s firmware. So who’s to blame? It’s certainly a possibility that some of the chips are faulty but not all of them and it’s possible that the firmware is partly to blame as well. Let’s not forget the network provider as well. Most 3G networks have just recently been implemented I’m sure there’s plenty of bugs to work out.

Richard Windsor of Nomura published a research note (spotted at GigaOm) Tuesday singling out the iPhone 3G’s chipset, made by Infineon, as the probable culprit for the reception problems we reported on Monday. The dropped calls, service interruptions, and abrupt network switches experienced by iPhone 3G users reminded Windsor of similar complaints five years ago, when 3G phones were first launched in Europe.

“We believe that these issues are typical of an immature chipset and radio protocol stack where we are almost certain that Infineon is the 3G supplier,” Windsor wrote. “This is not surprising as the Infineon 3G chipset solution has never really been tested in the hands of users. Some people will not experience these problems as it is only in areas where the radio signal weakens that the immaturity of the stack really shows.” (link)

New MacBooks and iPods around the corner?

With the first phase of the iPhone 3G launch in the rear view, Apple Inc. is now shifting much of its focus towards product refreshes targeting its two other revenue drivers and is advising resellers to be prepared for product shortages in the interim.

More specifically, the Cupertino-based company in recent days issued an advisement bulletin to some of its channel partners hinting at a manufacturing ramp down of iPods and certain Mac notebook models, which will result in limited supplies of those products in the coming weeks.

To best address this situation and assure ample supplies for new customer orders through August, Apple “strongly suggested” that resellers bring in — or place immediate lump orders for — approximately 4 weeks worth of their top selling iPod models. Supplies of the players would start to become extremely limited in the next seven days, the bulletin said. (link)


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