Posts Tagged 'canadians'

Why do you shop online?

A news tidbit offered up some interesting numbers about Canadian shoppers.
Online shopping up to $15 billion (almost $13 billion in 2007)
The number of orders are up since 2007. (95 million from 70 million)
Men more likely to buy something online than women (42% compared to 37%).
Most common product being travel services.

So why do you shop online?
I do it mostly out of convenience. When I’m at work and I want to buy something I can do it by a click of a button. Biggest complaints about in store shopping: store stock, lineups, the people, and parking. Nothing is worse than driving to the mall to buy something on sale only to see that “out of stock” sign. Then I feel obligated to buy something to ensure that the whole trip was not a waste. Who likes coming home empty handed?

Lineups suck, plain and simple. Nobody likes to be stuck behind the chatty senior, or the lady shopping for a family of 12 and two shopping carts, or in the so called “express lane” where the cashier is waiting for a price check on an item. Lines suck.

People suck too. I’m talking about the rude, smelly, fat, talking loudly on your cell phone losers who you’re grouped together with all looking for that item on sale. Doesn’t it suck too when they get the last one just ahead of you? GGrrrrr.

OMG, over there, the holy grail of parking! Oh wait, that’s a handicapped zone. *sigh, keep circling. End up following someone to their car, only to have them take 10 minutes to buckle their seatbelt, and fix their hair, before even starting the car. Then you park, rush in to buy your item, find out it’s out of stock, get back to your car to see your car door dented because of the idiot who parked next to you. Who designs these parking spots to be so small in the first place?!

Free shipping almost always seals the deal for me. If you can offer me delivery to my door at no extra cost I am more likely to buy stuff from your website, even if it’s not on sale.

Canada getting tough on copyright

So the party may be over for Canadian downloaders. Companies now have the right to go after infringers to the tune of $100 to $5,000 for breaking digital locks for the purpose of copying. The penalty goes up to $500 to $20,000 per offense for commercial activities. So much for Bill C-61. Some specific incidents that are mentioned are: PVRs are ok, legally purchased CDs to pcs and ipods are ok, cell phone unlocking is ok. The new bill also requires ISPs to keep tabs on what their customers are downloading. Ruh roh.

Torrent sites are also in danger for legal action. Backups are legal. It would appear on the surface it attempts to balance the rights of the content developer vs the consumer. The bill is still open to ongoing amendments and could possibly change as technology becomes available. In the meantime, start using private torrent sites.

Canadians in no iPad rush

With little fanfare iPads are launching in several countries starting tomorrow. For many Canadians there’s no rush to get one. The early adopters already own one after driving across the border or purchasing one from the grey market. Best Buy, Futureshop, and Apple stores expect to stock limited quantities of all 6 versions, however if you’re hoping to get one be advised that the entry level model ($549, 16 GB, wifi, non 3G) will probably sell out. At best you’ll have to drive to more than one store to get your hands on one if you don’t plan on lining up overnight.

I’m projecting the sales of the 3G version will be quite limp given the pathetic data plans offered by Rogers and Bell. $15 for 250 MB? Really? I suspect even the dumbest rich bastards won’t fall victim to that scam. Maybe if it came in a distinct color to denote that it was indeed the expensive version or at least some other markings to let everyone else know that you have a superior status symbol. Perhaps it would be a good idea for next year’s version, hmm?

For the poor folk look to the cheap electronics market of Shenzhen China where knock offs and bootlegs are plentiful. For a mere $100 you can own a 7″ ipad clone or if you want something with a little more power, $400 gets you a 10″ model with Windows 7. There’s always going to be a cheaper alternative to those who are willing to wait on technology.

Price plans, limited stock, or simply a poor choice to waste your money. Any way you look at it iPad sales will be lower than expected. While we are close to our neighbors to the south, Canadians are not blindly following sheep like our American cousins. Ipod yes. Iphone yes. Ipad no.

Android news

It looks like some Canadians are getting Android love, at least the Motorola Droid owners on Telus that is. Reportedly OS 2.1 is available via download directly from the Motorola site. Updates include: multi touch Google maps, Facebook widget, and more Android goodness. Rogers Wireless customers will just have to glare enviously at Telus Mobility users.

I know Android 2.1 is soooo yesterday. OS 2.2 is in the wild and should be released to the masses sometime in May. So what exactly does the updated OS entail? FM radio support, more free ram, better flash support, JIT compiler, and more. Canadians will just have to wait a year or so.

Got a Nexus One? Too bad. Google has decide to give up on the phone and turn it resources to other areas. Does your reception suck? Is your phone buggy? Don’t expect fixes coming any time soon. Enjoy your $529 brick.

Internet > TV

I’m sure there’s a general consensus that the Internet is better than television. At least now in Canada there’s numbers to back it up. According to the report Canadians on average spend 18 hours online and a mere 17 hours watching tv. OK, so it’s not a landslide victory but it’s a bit of a reality check. Shifting trends and changing social behavior it seems has changed rapidly. We’re seeing a convergence of media forms and social and entertainment activities. But if you’re like me, you split your time between screens and multitask. Watch tv AND play on the Internet at the SAME time.

Dell Mini 9: Canadians get no Ubuntu love

I’ve been constantly refreshing the the Canadian Dell site and this morning I was pleasantly surprised that the Mini 9 is now available. Awesome! One thing odd I noticed though, no Ubuntu option. WTF?

Just for fun I decided to call up the 1-800 number. On hold for a short while I got connected to and agent over in India (surprise, surprise) I tell him, “I’m on the Canadian website, and I noticed there’s no option for Ubuntu for the Mini 9, can I order the Mini 9 with Ubuntu instead of Windows XP?” After repeating myself and speaking slowly he informed me that I had been connected to the wrong department and forwards my call to another agent.

On hold for a bit longer I get connected to another agent. I ask the same question. He puts me on hold for a while and then comes back with this, “Currently the Mini 9 is not available with Ubuntu” and when I asked him if there were any plans to offer it with Ubuntu pre-installed he said that “this is a brand new launch, no information is available regarding that configuration”. Ok no problem, thanks.

He didn’t seem to want to let me off the line. Smelling a potential sale he gave me his agent code/number to put in when/if I decided to go ahead and purchase it online. This way he would be my “personal contact” and would be available for post purchase support. Um, yeah right. How about just telling me the truth? You get a commission, duh!

So I’m a little disappointed. U.S. customers have the option but Canadian are getting no Ubuntu love. Guess I’ll wait and see if there are any changes in the upcoming days.

Canadian site

U.S. site

Millions doing own taxes using software

Millions of Canadians are using software programs and becoming their own accountants when it comes to their taxes.

Software programs have been updated to take into account recent changes announced in the last federal budget, such as pension income splitting for seniors, children’s fitness credits and reduced income tax rates.

More than 4.1 million Canadians filed their taxes through the Canada Revenue Agency’s Netfile for the 2006 tax year.

Another roughly 8.8 million Canadians filed online through tax professionals for 2006.

That means for the 2006 tax year, the Canada Revenue Agency received just more than 50 per cent of its returns electronically, said spokesman Serge Paradis. (link)


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