Posts Tagged 'disc'

Western Digital: 10,000 rpm? pffftt! How’s 20,000 sound?

According to several sources close to the hard drive industry, Western Digital is working on a 20,000 RPM Raptor hard drive to combat the increasing pressure from SSD manufacturers.

We have spoken to a lot of people out here in Taipei about this industry’s direction and one thing is becoming clear: SSDs are going to be affordable in the next 12 to 18 months.

Because of this, hard drive manufacturers are starting to get a little worried about what marketshare SSDs might eventually take away from them—especially where performance is more of a concern than storage capacity.

And that’s exactly what Western Digital’s Raptor line is all about.

The new drive will be very similar to the recently-released VelociRaptor, in that it’ll be a 2.5in drive with a custom 3.5in housing built around it. Details are incredibly light at this stage, given that the product is still in development, and we don’t even have a release timeframe at the moment. (link)

SSD ready to usher old hard drives into the sunset

While capacities, fill times, and bandwidth have changed, latencies have, however, remained relatively static. Hard disks still use rotating platters with magnetic pits, and spin latencies can only decrease with increases in rotational speed. Spindle speeds have risen, from the 3500RPM Maxtor of yesteryear, through 4200, 5400, and today’s 7200RPM spindle speeds, with the transition to 10,000 and 15,000 RPM speeds accomplished in some sectors of the server space and burgeoning in the desktop space. But this reliance on physical moving parts has made their development hard; this is only a doubling of spindle and a latency cut from about 30 milliseconds to about 10 milliseconds. While main memory latencies have fallen by a factor of ten, and CPU speeds have risen by factors of thousands, hard disk latencies have remained comparatively static in the milliseconds for those same 17 years.

The result of all of these trends is that it’s easier and easier to store huge amounts of data at lower and lower cost, but the increasing data bandwidth and low latency that modern storage needs demand is harder to come by. I’ve heard from a source that a copy of the text of the entire Internet, stored by Google and its competitors and searched for text in web search queries, is in the vicinity of 20TB. In hard disks, this would now cost a mere $4,000 in disks (much more in servers) but would be completely unsuited to this kind of storage due to the long read time of the disks; a total read for a search would take hours. Instead, Google hosts its web servers from huge clusters of thousands of servers, storing complete copies of the text of the internet in RAM, at about half a million dollars in DDR2 per cluster. (ArsTechnica)

Confidential disc left inside laptop given to computer store

A British computer store has found what it says is a confidential government computer disc hidden inside a laptop brought in for repair.Jonathan Parry of Leapfrog Computers in Bolton says a customer purchased the computer on eBay. When a technician opened it up, he found a compact disc marked “Home Office” and “Private and Confidential” wedged underneath the keyboard.

It was not immediately clear whether the disc was genuine. Britain’s Home Office is the government body responsible for maintaining law and order and fighting terrorism.

Parry says when staff realized the disc was encrypted, they called the police. (link)

Largest ever pirate disc lab busted

Cinema chiefs announced Monday that local authorities had busted a 52 million dollar secret optical disc burner lab — the biggest pirate lab ever to be found in Malaysia.Mike Ellis, the Motion Picture Association’s (MPA) regional director said the raid was conducted last Friday by a team of 20 officers from Malaysia’s ministry of domestic trade and consumer affairs.

The sting operation was supported by the Malaysian Federation Against Copyright Theft, representing MPA, he said. The pirate optical disc burner lab was located in a suburb near the capital.

Ellis, who is based in neighboring Singapore said four people, including two female workers aged between 24 and 40 were arrested and a total of 340 optical disc burners were seized. (link)


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