Posts Tagged 'market'

Intel’s stonewalling forces VIA out of the motherboard biz

VIA is now focusing on x86 processors and the integrated motherboard market, rather than chipsets for third-party CPUs.

Previously one of the best chipset makers for enthusiasts looking for high performance on a budget, VIA has told Custom PC that it now sees no future in making chipsets for third parties such as Intel and AMD.

Speaking to Custom PC, VIA’s vice president of corporate marketing in Taiwan, Richard Brown, explained that: ‘One of the main reasons we originally moved into the x86 processor business was because we believed that ultimately the third party chipset market would disappear, and we would need to have the capability to provide a complete platform.’ (link)

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Legit game purchases:1 Pirated: 20

The other critique outside Crytek was the fact that the PC industry is really, at the moment, I would say the most intensely pirated market ever. It’s crazy how the ratio between sales to piracy is probably 1 to 15 to 1 to 20 right now. For one sale there are 15 to 20 pirates and pirate versions, and that’s a big shame for the PC industry. I hope with Warhead I hope we improve the situation, but at the same time it may have an impact on [our] PC exclusivity in the future.

But at the end of the day, I think our message is if you’re a PC gamer, and you really want to respect the platform, then you should stop pirating. We will see less and less games appearing on the PC, or less and less games pushing the boundaries of PC gaming. Or, in other words, speaking in terms of PC exclusivity, we would only consider full PC exclusives–if the situation continues like this or gets worse–I think we would only consider PC exclusive titles that are either online or multiplayer and no more single-player. (link)

Red Hat to stick to the nerds, no more “it doesn’t look like Leopard” complaints

Red Hat is dropping its consumer Linux desktop. That makes sense, analysts said, because the desktop is not Red Hat’s core strength. Red Hat develops Linux-based software and solutions for enterprises.

As a public, for-profit company, Red Hat must create products and technologies with an eye on the bottom line, and with consumer desktops this is much harder than with servers, the company said on its blog this week.

“The desktop market suffers from having one dominant vendor, and some people still perceive that today’s Linux desktops simply don’t provide a practical alternative. Of course, a growing number of technically savvy users and companies have discovered that today’s Linux desktop is indeed a practical alternative,” Red Hat said. (link)

“Goodbye Moto” Motorola splits from handset division

Motorola Inc said on Wednesday it would split into two publicly traded entities to separate its loss-making handset division from its other businesses, sending its shares up about 5 percent.

The move, which comes amid an intensifying proxy battle against activist investor Carl Icahn ahead of a May 5 annual meeting, could be a prelude for a joint venture for the cell phone business, analysts said.

They said separating the cell phone business, which has been losing market share to rivals like Nokia and Samsung Electronics, could help Motorola find a strategic investor, such as among Asian handset makers that are keen to win a bigger share of the U.S. market. (link)

Ask.com gives up, Google is still king

In a dramatic about-face, Ask.com is abandoning its effort to outshine Internet search leader Google Inc. and will instead focus on a narrower market consisting of married women looking for help managing their lives. As part of the new direction outlined Tuesday, Ask will lay off about 40 employees, or eight per cent of its workforce.

With the shift, the Oakland, Calif.-based company will return to its roots by concentrating on finding answers to basic questions about recipes, hobbies and children’s homework.

The decision to cater to married women primarily living in the southern and midwestern United States comes after Ask spent years trying to build a better all-purpose search engine than Google. (link)

iPhone creating huge gray market

Encamped along the aisles of the massive Zhongguancun Kemao Electronics Market in Beijing are many people like Li Zhongxin, of the Beijing Xinyu Lianhe Telecom Equipment Co. Li sits atop a plastic stool in front of his open-air stall on the third floor, scanning the throngs of shoppers for would-be customers. There’s no sign of Apple’s iPhone among the thicket of cell phones, handset covers, and other accessories hung on shelves and inside the waist-high glass display case, but he’ll be glad to show you one. In exchange for an up-front payment, “you can buy as many as you’d like,” Li says.

The assertion may seem misplaced in a country where Apple has yet to introduce the iPhone. The device is officially on sale only in the U.S., Britain, France, and Germany, where Apple has signed exclusive contracts with cellular carriers including AT&T. Yet Li’s booming business is the very real byproduct of pent-up demand for a much-hyped device made by a company that places strict limits on where and how it’s sold. (link)


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