Posts Tagged 'men'

Women better coders than men?

We all know men hate to ask for directions. Apparently they loathe putting directions in computer code, too.

Emma McGrattan, the senior vice-president of engineering for computer-database company Ingres–and one of Silicon Valley’s highest-ranking female programmers–insists that men and women write code differently. Women are more touchy-feely and considerate of those who will use the code later, she says. They’ll intersperse their code–those strings of instructions that result in nifty applications and programs–with helpful comments and directions, explaining why they wrote the lines the way they did and exactly how they did it.

The code becomes a type of “roadmap” for others who might want to alter it or add to it later, says McGrattan, a native of Ireland who has been with Ingres since 1992.

Men, on the other hand, have no such pretenses. Often, “they try to show how clever they are by writing very cryptic code,” she tells the Business Technology Blog. “They try to obfuscate things in the code,” and don’t leave clear directions for people using it later. McGrattan boasts that 70% to 80% of the time, she can look at a chunk of computer code and tell if it was written by a man or a woman. (link)

I call “bullshit”, MySpace & Facebook is just for hooking up

A new study across a wide range of social networks sheds more insight into the ways men and women approach these service. As it turns out, women are more likely to be in it for the socializing, while men are more likely to use these sites for business.

Social web search company Rapleaf performed a study of over 30 million users across sites like Bebo, Facebook, Friendster, Hi5, LiveJournal, MySpace, Flickr, and more. Each user included in the study had at least one friend on one of these services, and Rapleaf broke its results down according to the number of connections users had: “Social Networkers” have 1-100 friends, “Connectors” have 100-1,000 friends, “Super Connectors” have 1,000-10,000 friends, and “Uber Connectors” have 10,000 friends or more.

Overall, 53.57 percent of Rapleaf’s massive study group were female, while 46.43 percent were male. Social Networkers with 1-100 friends made up about 80 percent of the study group, among which women had an average of 62 friends with men at 57. Rapleaf says women are more likely to be Social Networkers, but doesn’t offer exact numbers in that regard. (link)

Security threats not gender specific, nor is knowledge

When it comes to online security, everyone thinks they’re an expert. Especially men, it seems, as a new “report” funded by security software maker AVG suggests. The company says that, like most things, men tend to think that they know more about online security than women. That’s apparently not true, however, as AVG states that everyone suffers online attacks equally, despite what they may think.

The findings come from a survey of 1,400 adults in the UK about their own knowledge of security while using the ‘Net. Men were exceptionally confident in their own security prowess, and only 4 percent of them said they didn’t know what kind on online protection they had in place.

But confidence doesn’t always translate into reality, it seems. AVG’s survey found that a third of all users—both men and women—had suffered some form of identity theft. And when asked whether they would change their habits as a result, only 20 percent said that they would. I guess when it comes to being complacent, men and women are on equal ground. link

Men: avid gamers, less willing to admit it

Men are just as likely as women to play casual video games, but are less likely to admit it, according to an industry report that shatters a widely held industry belief that such games appeal mainly to women.

But women are more likely to buy casual games — a broad term referring to games that are easy to pick and play — than men, who are more determined to find a free version or try to thwart anti-piracy protections on games.

Those were some of the findings in the first yearly market report by the Casual Games Association, an industry group aimed at promoting a fast-growing segment that accounts for about 10 percent of the $30 billion global video game market.

“Everyone always thought that casual games were something that only appeal to women,” Jessica Tams, managing director of the association, said in an interview. “We have always been obsessed about making games for women.”

Surveys of players showed that, while nearly three-fourths of people who bought casual games were women, the players of such games were split 50-50 between the sexes.

(story)


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