Posts Tagged 'mlc'

MLC NAND technology to put SSDs in every household

MLC (multiple level cell) NAND technology allows for higher density of data storage capacity. This could greatly lower costs for data centers by up to 4 times. There are still some performance, reliability, and endurance issues to work out but the technology looks to make solid state drives a household product.

SLC (single level cell) NAND memory can store 1 bit per cell. This allows for higher read/write speeds and up to 100,000 write cycles. MLC NAND memory is capable of 2,000 to 10,000 write cycles but can store multiple bits per cell meaning more storage capacity. As well in order for MLC to function properly complicated firmware is required to handle data allocation and organization. (link)

The main problem with SSDs has been write performance. The fixed block sizes forces inefficient handling of data storage. Data is spread out evenly across the flash memory but slows access time and increases wear and tear. Adding RAM buffers can speed up read/write times.

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Vista not optimized for SSD, delayed

“The next generation of SSDs will use multilevel cell (MLC) technology, which will require a more sophisticated controller – a crucial component in solid state drives. These drives will have capacities ranging up to 128GB, 160GB, and later, 256GB. MLC drives are expected to appear in a wider selection of notebooks later this year.”

Yes, yes, less details. I don’t really care about what you need to do, just get me faster bigger drives at an affordable price.

“… Chief Executive Officer Eli Harari said that Windows Vista will present a special challenge for solid state drive makers. “As soon as you get into Vista applications in notebook and desktop, you start running into very demanding applications because Vista is not optimized for flash memory solid state disk,” he said.”

Vista poses problems for all of us dumb users who upgraded. Tell me something I don’t know.

“This is due to Vista’s design. “The next generation controllers need to basically compensate for Vista shortfalls,” he said.” (link)

No surprise here, everything else has to compensate for the resource hungry Vista. Is Vista optimized for anything?


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