Posts Tagged 'os'

Android news

It looks like some Canadians are getting Android love, at least the Motorola Droid owners on Telus that is. Reportedly OS 2.1 is available via download directly from the Motorola site. Updates include: multi touch Google maps, Facebook widget, and more Android goodness. Rogers Wireless customers will just have to glare enviously at Telus Mobility users.

I know Android 2.1 is soooo yesterday. OS 2.2 is in the wild and should be released to the masses sometime in May. So what exactly does the updated OS entail? FM radio support, more free ram, better flash support, JIT compiler, and more. Canadians will just have to wait a year or so.

Got a Nexus One? Too bad. Google has decide to give up on the phone and turn it resources to other areas. Does your reception suck? Is your phone buggy? Don’t expect fixes coming any time soon. Enjoy your $529 brick.

Asus Eee PC but done by Dell and better

We got a nice helping of slides dropped on our virtual doorstep this evening, fleshing out Dell’s upcoming netbook — which they seem to be calling the “Dell E.” Um, Eeenteresting name choice, but that doesn’t seem set in stone, and there’s plenty else going on here to ponder over. Dell’s breaking the Dell E into two device types, a 8.9-inch model clearly meant to take on the Eee 900, and the 12.1-inch “E Slim” which actually looks positioned to take on the MacBook Air and X300, at a mere 0.8-inches thick, though perhaps in a lower-end capacity. Even the 8.9-inch model will have some distinctions, with E Classic model for super low-end use, and E Video and E Video+ for more RAM, larger flash storage, webcams and Bluetooth in the + model. Rollout looks to be slated for August for the E, August / September-ish for the E Slim, and a followup for both of those in October of WWAN, with WiMAX after that. Dell even has a second version of both devices slated for Q2 2009, but that’s all we know about those so far. Perhaps most interesting is that all of these run Linux and Windows XP, and while it’s not clear if there’s a full-featured Linux OS onboard, there does seem to be an instant-on, Foleo-esque Linux included on all of them called BlackTop. We’re not sure if there’s any relation to Splashtop, but the janky-ass interface and email / calendar / contacts apps seem to be telling us no. BlackTop will support WWAN and WiFi, and Dell plans to move the 2.0 version to the Latitude and Vostro lines in a year or two. Peep the slides below for all the gory details. Oh, and the price? Dell E starts at $299. (link)

Save Windows XP, sign the petition

Microsoft Corp.’s operating systems run most personal computers around the globe and are a cash cow for the world’s largest software maker. But you’d never confuse a Windows user with the passionate fans of Mac OS X or even the free Linux operating system.

Unless it’s someone running Windows XP, a version Microsoft wants to retire.

Fans of the six-year-old operating system set to be pulled off store shelves in June have papered the Internet with blog posts, cartoons and petitions recently. They trumpet its superiority to Windows Vista, Microsoft’s latest PC operating system, whose consumer launch last January was greeted with lukewarm reviews.

No matter how hard Microsoft works to persuade people to embrace Vista, some just can’t be wowed. They complain about Vista’s hefty hardware requirements, its less-than-peppy performance, occasional incompatibility with other programs and devices and frequent, irritating security pop-up windows. (CNN)

Save Windows XP petition

AirPort disk not supported by Time Machine, wha?

Apple confirmed for me last week that a feature for using hard drives attached via USB to an AirPort Extreme Base Station is an unsupported feature. The company declined to provide further information. This feature was available in the betas of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, as has been widely reported, but was removed from the public Leopard feature list and from the shipping version of the operating system. Apple had been working on providing me a definitive statement since my review of Time Capsule for Macworld was published on 21-Mar-08.

What a “lack of support” means is that if you attempt to use an 802.11n AirPort Extreme Base Station for Time Machine backup, you won’t get any help from Apple’s technical support, something that readers have already told me. I’ve been receiving reports that USB-attached drives work erratically with an AirPort Extreme. TidBITS editor Joe Kissell and I have been discussing the strange array of scenarios in which you find an Apple Filing Protocol (AFP) volume that’s shared by the AirPort Extreme server not appearing automatically for Time Machine. (See “MacVoices Podcast Covers Time Capsule Ins and Outs,” 2008-04-03, for links to the podcasts. I also talked about Time Capsule and this problem in a podcast on 26-Mar-08 with Jason Snell, editorial director for Macworld.) (link)

Apple throttling non-Apple software, unfortunate biproduct

Some of you may have noticed that the Firefox 3 nightly builds have felt a lot snappier since a few weeks ago. There’s an interesting story in that, one that I finally have time to write up. We’ve had a number of bugs on the Mac where people were complaining of bad performance compared to Firefox 2, usually involving a test where a page was scrolled by a small step 100 or so times, and the time from start to finish was recorded. In many of these tests, Fx3 was coming in at 50% to 500%+ slower. This was odd, because in theory the graphics layer (which is what scrolling is mostly exercising) in Firefox 3 should be faster, given that it’s talking almost directly to Quartz.

Slashdot seems to have picked up on this, and in typical style, has completely misunderstood the post. To be clear, I do not think that Apple is in any way trying to purposely “cripple” non-Apple software. I also do not think that undocumented APIs give Safari any kind of “significant performance advantage” (as Firefox 3 should show!). However, as I said, the undocumented functionality could be useful for Firefox and other apps to implement things in an simpler (and potentially more efficient) manner. I don’t think this is malicious, it’s just an unfortunate cutting of corners that is way too easy for a company that’s not fully open to do.(link)

Vista more secure? WTF?

Microsoft is making crazy claims again. Vista and XP more secure than other operating systems. Jeff Jones the security strategy director at Microsoft even made up a nice PDF for you to easily read.

“This paper analyzes the vulnerability disclosures and security updates for the first year of Windows Vista and looks at it in the context of its predecessor, Windows XP, along with other modern workstation operating systems Red Hat, Ubuntu and Apple products.

The results of the analysis show that Windows Vista has an improved security vulnerability profile over its predecessor. Analysis of security updates also shows that Microsoft improvements to the security update process and development process have reduced the impact of security updates to Windows administrators significantly compared to its predecessor, Windows XP.”

But I thought Mac didn’t get viruses?

“… from what our tiny brains make of the case, such an argument doesn’t take into account factors like just how many people are trying to exploit a particular platform/vulnerability, or just how damaging each exploit can be.”

I’m sure bloggers will respond shortly.

Apple to make 100 corrections in 10.5.2 update

Due out next month as Mac OS X 10.5.2, the update will deliver to users of the company’s Leopard operating system nearly 100 code corrections and enhancements, people familiar with the software say.

Among them are twenty new fixes that turned up as part of Mac OS X 10.5.2 build 9C16, which was released privately to developers during last week’s Macworld Expo. Some of the more prominent fixes in that build target problems with resuming Time Machine backups and previewing PDF, image and mail attachments.

Since seeding the first pre-release copies of the Leopard update in mid-December, Apple has asked that its developer community test the release quite broadly. The latest build arrived without exception, maintaining a list of thirty seven core focus areas that swapped out an emphasis on 802.11 wireless testing for that of Active Directory. (link)


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 29 other followers

Technorati – Blog Search

Add to Technorati Favorites

submit express