Posts Tagged 'recovery'

The reality of an hd crash

When your computer crashes it can point to major problems. I’m not talking about a simple problem that’s resolved by a reboot or reinstall. I’m talking about a physical hard drive crash. Heads fully contacting the platter surface, scraping and spreading debris inside your hard drive at 7,200 RPM. While the drive itself is no better than a doorstop or paperweight at this point, it may still be possible to recover your data.

Why you (or me for that matter)? Hard drives will fail over time. The physical wear and tear that occurs on a regular basis every time you turn on your computer, copy a file, or even when your screen saver is running adds up to hard drive wear. Managing your system files in a proper environment can also factor in to whether your drive lasts 5 years or 1. There are several disk utilities that can help you monitor the health of your hard drive but in the end it’s still up to you to back up your important files on an ongoing basis.

The repairs that occur within a clean room environment are delicate and require a certain expertise. It’s not something you can learn in college. Managing data storage will become the next hottest job trend as new data centers open and expand their capabilities. There will be plenty of opportunities if you know anything about maintaining massive amounts of servers and hard drives and being able to do it the most efficiently as possible.

As for the hard drive, whether it’s the platter, the motor, the heads, or the electronics that fail the problem cannot be fixed by the average home user. Even IT professionals aren’t trained to perform these types of repairs. Talk to a data recovery expert and get the facts. The more information you are able to provide the more accurate a quotation can be. Don’t rely on the guy who can’t even explain what a servo is. Get the right data and make an informed decision.

Advertisements

Before You Take Your Computer In For Service …

It’s a good idea to back up your data. Why? Just read this story from Consumerist. Long story short, the computer place screwed up and now people don’t have their data. The first mistake was not backing up their data. The second mistake was going to THAT computer store. It’s widely known that they’ve failed on multiple occasions. Plenty of blame to go around. I’m curious to know who’s actually doing the recovery service on the store’s behalf, because I’m fairly certain there’s nobody there competent enough to perform data recovery. Hopefully one of the bigger companies will catch wind of the story and offer up some discounted service for the poor couple. Don’t trust the computer place to protect your data, perform regular backups. AND don’t buy the extended warranty! It’s a complete waste of money.

Data Storage for a Billion Years

Yes, a BILLION years. Sound far fetched? Futuristic technology? Not quite. Scientific researchers have been able to demonstrate data storage memory utilzing carbon nano tubes. The technology can store, in theory, a trillion bits of data per square inch for a billion years. The technology potentially will be available in 2 years. It uses crystalline iron nano particles inside a specialized carbon tube to work it’s magic. To put that in perspective the particles are a fraction of the width of a human hair, that’s damn tiny. On top of that it’s low voltage and energy efficient.

Perhaps the days of hard drive crashes will soon be over. No more headaches, no more data recovery issues to deal with. It’s all smoke and mirrors at this point with little or no consumer level application but maybe it will show up in a secret government labs somewhere. There has always been a big gap between theory and real world application.

Disaster Proof Backup

For many companies struggling to keep up with user demands a data disaster is just a few hours away. Business demands are relying heavily on information management and protection. Backup technology has moved up the ladder of importance as well as practices to limit data loss and data recovery scenarios. The focus has been on fortifying data centers with multiple and redundancy checks. Better to be over-cautious then explaining to the boss why the company servers are down. However the costs are often enough to force small and midsized companies down the riskier road. Backup systems are getting expensive and complex to manage and often get outsourced. Off-site backups still leaves room for downtime but paying someone else to do the job is usually cheaper than investing in an entire department of your own.

A few companies have come out with their own black box built to withstand all kinds of data disasters. The unit uses solid state drives raided together to provide the ultimate backup system. Remote access, full encryption, and software to help you manage your data.

Netgear bolsters NAS lineup

The ReadyNAS NVX (NAS and iSCSI support) a storage system for SOHO. Features file sharing, remote access, easy backup and data recovery for users with limited IT knowledge. Windows, UNIX/Linux and Mac operating systems. Perfect for server storage email, SQL, and other databases. Support for Time Machine (Mac), Apple Filing Protocol (AFP), Bonjour software (device auto discovery) attached to the LAN. Multiple PCs backed up to a single destination for quick recovery from data failures. Bi-directional backup using SMB or CIFS, HTTP, FTP, NFS and rsync. Three 2.0 USB ports, RAID 0/1/5, encryption/SSL, quiet sync and smart sync resume, FAT32, Ext2, Ext3, and NTFS.

4 drive bay storage available now for $1,500 for 2 TB of storage capacity. Full 24/7 technical support and a 5 year warranty. Free 30 day online backup service for all ReadyNAS systems ($5.95/month for end users, $19.95/month commercial). Netgear ReadyNAS

Tech on TV: 24

Did you happen to catch the television show “24” last night? If you’re any type of a geek I’m sure you spotted a few laughable technology incidents during the show. For me there were 2 spots where I just could not suspend reality and be entertained. There’s a scene where inside the FBI the technicians working for the secret organization manage to implement a system wide format. Yes, silly I know, but it moved the plot along. You can’t have Jack Bauer (Kiefer Sutherland) always yelling “put down the weapon!”. So according to the grand wise old television, all that is required to perform a system wide network format is a “special” I/O card, I’m guessing it was PCI, reprogram the firmware, plug the card into a server hot, without shutting or powering down, then type some command line functions and voila. System wide format. Oh and did I mention that you have to “tie the servers together”? HA!

Another issue I had was Chloe, magically recovering data of the secret list of agents stored on an “unknown media device” (which simply looked like a metal SD card or metal USB stick). And it wipes itself after one use? HA! As well Chloe manages to perform another magical data recovery after the system wide format. ZOMG! Run some data recovery software and there’s the files! A secure wipe would have taken a very long time. Sure maybe the bad guys could have performed a quick wipe but any cheap software could have saved the data files. Script writer FAIL! I guess I’m just nerding out but I have to pick on something.

Free hard drive recovery*

*only if you have a Seagate ST31000340AS 1TB hard drive
Apparently these bad boys are failing left and right. (epic thread) It was brought to the attention of Seagate when users began flooding the user forum with complaints with the 1TB units failing just after a few months of use. To quiet the issue threads were deleted which only made the problem worse. Even more attention was shone on the faulty drives and now everybody knew about it.

Instead of the hard stance Seagate took, they did a 180 and offered free data recovery for those bad hard drives and a fresh firmware update to fix the problem. (Tech Report) Happy now? Are you starting to wonder about your hard drive?

Look, the fact is that hard drives fail. Yes, they shouldn’t be failing after a few months, however it can happen. Good on Seagate to offer the free service to the affected drives. It’s just keeping good public relations. I’m glad I didn’t rush out and buy one when they came out. Just remember to keep a good backup.


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 29 other followers

Technorati – Blog Search

Add to Technorati Favorites

submit express