Posts Tagged 'state'



Samsung to produce SSD’s for the enterprise masses

Samsung has announced that they are planning on mass producing a new SSD lineup in 25GB and 50GB capacities. The new solid state drives are said to be faster, more durable, and greener than “the other guys”. They are targeting the enterprise market with high end servers and a lot of money to spend. Read speeds of 100MB/second and write it at 80MB/s. The drives are due out next month so start saving.

Vista not optimized for SSD, delayed

“The next generation of SSDs will use multilevel cell (MLC) technology, which will require a more sophisticated controller – a crucial component in solid state drives. These drives will have capacities ranging up to 128GB, 160GB, and later, 256GB. MLC drives are expected to appear in a wider selection of notebooks later this year.”

Yes, yes, less details. I don’t really care about what you need to do, just get me faster bigger drives at an affordable price.

“… Chief Executive Officer Eli Harari said that Windows Vista will present a special challenge for solid state drive makers. “As soon as you get into Vista applications in notebook and desktop, you start running into very demanding applications because Vista is not optimized for flash memory solid state disk,” he said.”

Vista poses problems for all of us dumb users who upgraded. Tell me something I don’t know.

“This is due to Vista’s design. “The next generation controllers need to basically compensate for Vista shortfalls,” he said.” (link)

No surprise here, everything else has to compensate for the resource hungry Vista. Is Vista optimized for anything?

Super Talent SSD offering, cheaper and faster

“Super Talent sprinkles fairy dust on its “budget” SSD lineup”

Is ‘fairy dust’ the technical term?

“The solid state disk (SSD) market is really starting to heat up. Super Talent threw down the gauntlet with its low-priced MX series SSDs. OCZ then returned the favor with its Core Series SSDs.”

Cheap SSD’s! Yes!

“OCZ held the upper hand with not only lower pricing for its Core Series SSDs, but also the advantage of faster read/write performance. Super Talent’s MX SSDs clocked in with read speeds of 120MB/sec and write speeds of 40MB/sec. OCZ’s Core SSDs feature read speeds of 120 to 143 MB/sec and write speeds of 80 to 93 MB/sec depending on the capacity of the drive in question.”

I like OCZ never heard of Super Talent. I have heard of ‘Super Fantastic Talent Show’ it’s a Japanese game show I believe.

“With OCZ breathing down its neck, Super Talent worked a little magic on its MX drives. The 15GB and 30GB models now feature read speeds of 120MB/sec and write speeds of 60MB/sec. The 60GB and 120GB have the same read speeds, but now have write speeds of 80MB/sec.” (link)

Pricing on 120GB? Ouch! Still out of my wallet range.

SSD ready to usher old hard drives into the sunset

While capacities, fill times, and bandwidth have changed, latencies have, however, remained relatively static. Hard disks still use rotating platters with magnetic pits, and spin latencies can only decrease with increases in rotational speed. Spindle speeds have risen, from the 3500RPM Maxtor of yesteryear, through 4200, 5400, and today’s 7200RPM spindle speeds, with the transition to 10,000 and 15,000 RPM speeds accomplished in some sectors of the server space and burgeoning in the desktop space. But this reliance on physical moving parts has made their development hard; this is only a doubling of spindle and a latency cut from about 30 milliseconds to about 10 milliseconds. While main memory latencies have fallen by a factor of ten, and CPU speeds have risen by factors of thousands, hard disk latencies have remained comparatively static in the milliseconds for those same 17 years.

The result of all of these trends is that it’s easier and easier to store huge amounts of data at lower and lower cost, but the increasing data bandwidth and low latency that modern storage needs demand is harder to come by. I’ve heard from a source that a copy of the text of the entire Internet, stored by Google and its competitors and searched for text in web search queries, is in the vicinity of 20TB. In hard disks, this would now cost a mere $4,000 in disks (much more in servers) but would be completely unsuited to this kind of storage due to the long read time of the disks; a total read for a search would take hours. Instead, Google hosts its web servers from huge clusters of thousands of servers, storing complete copies of the text of the internet in RAM, at about half a million dollars in DDR2 per cluster. (ArsTechnica)

China, “Hey, you mapped our secret missile base!”

China has launched an investigation into online mapping services by Internet giants including Google and Sohu in an effort to protect state secrets and territorial integrity, state press said.

According to Min Yiren, vice head of the State Bureau of Surveying and Mapping, authorities hope to get rid of online maps that wrongly depict China’s borders or that reveal military secrets, the People’s Daily said Monday.

The government began the investigation into the problematic maps in April and will continue it until the end of the year, the report said.

Min cited five areas of concern, with the redrawing of China’s borders and placing disputed territory outside the nation the top priority, it said. (link)

Seagate pussies go after small SSD company

Barely three weeks ago, Seagate CEO Bill Watkins simultaneously pronounced solid state drives (SSDs) to be toys for a niche market and then threatened to start suing people if it appeared that flash-based storage might become a threat to the magnetic storage industry. That date has apparently arrived. Seagate filed suit against US-based STEC today, claiming that the SSD manufacturer is in violation of four patents covering solid-state memory storage, memory backup, and a drive’s ability to scan/test itself in order to check for errors.

Watkins has already issued a statement “reassuring” the public that this is simply a case of Seagate moving to protect its unjustly infringed IP. STEC, unsurprisingly, has a somewhat different take on the situation. According to STEC, Seagate has never attempted to open communications regarding any patent infringement. Furthermore, as reported by CNET, STEC believes it can prove Seagate’s patents invalid and inapplicable. It’s all standard stuff in patent litigation. (link)

Intel shows off SSD drives

An Intel executive demonstrated upcoming solid-state drives at this week’s Intel Developer Forum in Shanghai, noting that the chipmaker is on track to deliver the drives later this year.

Meanwhile, an Intel fellow describes his “addiction” to solid-state drives in a blog posted Wednesday.

SSDs, if you don’t already know, are based on flash memory chip technology and have no moving parts. Hard-disk drives, in contrast, use read-write heads that hover over spinning platters to access and record data. With no moving parts, SSDs avoid both the risk of mechanical failure and the mechanical delays of hard drives. Therefore, SSDs are generally faster and more reliable. The catch is the cost: SSDs are currently much more expensive than hard drives.

Knut Grimsrud, an Intel fellow who leads an R&D group responsible for developing new mainstream storage innovations, described in a blog the difference between using a hard drive and a solid-state drive. (link)


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