Posts Tagged 'steve'

Is Tablet Computing For You?

Microsoft CEO unveiled a tablet during his recent keynote. Steve Balmer showed of the HP Slate (hmm I thought had the iSlate name locked up?) calling it a “little pc” and of course running Windows. Bringing a tablet device to market isn’t a brand new concept, just the way it was implemented and marketed. Perhaps it was originally before it’s time. With the surprising success of the Kindle and netbooks perhaps consumers are ready for tablet computing. Ultraportable computers have always been coveted however technology has now offered up low energy cpu’s with slim form factors making usable tablet devices possible. And of course to cut down on space, touchscreen input is a no brainer.

So is tablet computing for you? For those looking for a more powerful ebook reader this might be a purchase worth making. Power users may want to hold off until Intel comes out with a more powerful Atom processor. The $500 price tag may scare consumers away, however slap a little Apple logo on it and suddenly it’s not that expensive.

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$1 annual salary

Plus expenses (up to $1 million), plus other perks (private jet, home security, chauffeur, etc.), oh and don’t forget stock options. Do Apple shareholders really care about Steve Jobs’ total compensation package? Probably not because he’s Steve Jobs. He’s THE man. What if it was someone else? I’m pretty sure they would care. The whole “$1” is kind of silly. We all know he’s getting paid in other ways but it sure sounds good on paper. However it is important to note that Jobs portfolio lost more than a billion dollars in value during the economic downturn. That’s right, “a billion”. So how much do you make?

Steve Jobs not expected at keynote … panic!

Recently Apple has announced that Steve Jobs would not be delivering upcoming the keynote speech. Panic across the board. Stock drops, fanboys (and girls) predicting gloom, bloggers have stuff to write about. The speculation over Steve’s health comes up, yet again. Perhaps it really is an issue or maybe he’s just tired of giving keynote speeches? As well we should consider that nobody likes giving bad news. Fewer new product launches, gloomy economic outlook, definitely not topics you can glamorize, even if you’re Steve Jobs. Everybody likes the guy who gives out the bonuses but hate the guy who does the firing. No news is good news.

Steve Jobs ‘MobileMe sucks’

In an internal e-mail sent to Apple employees this evening, Steve Jobs admitted that MobileMe was launched too early and “not up to Apple’s standards.” The e-mail, seen by Ars Technica, acknowledges MobileMe’s flaws and what could have been done to better handle the launch. In addition to needing more time and testing, Jobs believes that Apple should have rolled MobileMe’s services out slowly instead of launching it “as a monolithic service.” For example, over-the-air iPhone syncing could have gone up initially, then web apps one by one (Mail, Calendar, etc.).

Jobs goes on. “It was a mistake to launch MobileMe at the same time as iPhone 3G, iPhone 2.0 software and the App Store,” he says. “We all had more than enough to do, and MobileMe could have been delayed without consequence.” We agree with that one. (link)

Microsoft breaks down, gives in to XP users demands

Microsoft could re-think plans to phase out its Windows XP operating system by June 30 if customers show they want to keep it but so far they have not, Chief Executive Steve Ballmer said.

“XP will hit an end-of-life. We have announced one. If customer feedback varies we can always wake up smarter but right now we have a plan for end-of-life for new XP shipments,” Ballmer told a news conference on Thursday.

Microsoft has announced that it will stop licensing Windows XP to computer makers and end retail sales by June 30.

Ballmer said most retailers sold computers with Vista, the latest version of its Windows operating system, and most consumers were choosing to buy Vista. (link)

Making mistakes has been profitable for Apple

One Infinite Loop, Apple’s street address, is a programming in-joke — it refers to a routine that never ends. But it is also an apt description of the travails of parking at the Cupertino, California, campus. Like most things in Silicon Valley, Apple’s lots are egalitarian; there are no reserved spots for managers or higher-ups. Even if you’re a Porsche-driving senior executive, if you arrive after 10 am, you should be prepared to circle the lot endlessly, hunting for a space.

But there is one Mercedes that doesn’t need to search for very long, and it belongs to Steve Jobs. If there’s no easy-to-find spot and he’s in a hurry, Jobs has been known to pull up to Apple’s front entrance and park in a handicapped space. (Sometimes he takes up two spaces.) It’s become a piece of Apple lore — and a running gag at the company. Employees have stuck notes under his windshield wiper: “Park Different.” They have also converted the minimalist wheelchair symbol on the pavement into a Mercedes logo.

Jobs’ fabled attitude toward parking reflects his approach to business: For him, the regular rules do not apply. Everybody is familiar with Google’s famous catchphrase, “Don’t be evil.” It has become a shorthand mission statement for Silicon Valley, encompassing a variety of ideals that — proponents say — are good for business and good for the world: Embrace open platforms. Trust decisions to the wisdom of crowds. Treat your employees like gods. (link)

Why fanboys hate tech reporters?

Mossberg’s column ran for about 900 words; just 70 of them, or 8 percent, by my count, suggested anything even approaching negative criticism. Apple loved the review so much that it excerpted it in advertisements. Apple CEO Steve Jobs quoted it in his speeches. But Mossberg says that his mailbox told a different story. Several Apple fans felt slighted. What did he have against Apple? they wanted to know.

There are many tribes in the tech world: TiVo lovers, Blackberry addicts, Palm Treo fanatics, and people who exhibit unhealthy affection for their Roomba robotic vacuum cleaners. But there is no bigger tribe, and none more zealous, than fans of Apple, who are infamous for their sensitivity to slams, real or imagined, against the beloved company. “It’s funny — even if I write a generally positive piece about Apple, I still get more complaints from Apple partisans” than from opponents, Mossberg says. He has even coined a term for the effect. “I call it the Doctrine of Insufficient Adulation.”

In my years as a tech reporter, I’ve dealt first-hand with Mossberg’s doctrine — as well as its opposite, the PC fans who see a pro-Apple press bias in my work (a few years ago, Salon’s customer service department informed me that a reader called to cancel a subscription in response to my piece, “Hallelujah, the Mac Is Back.”) (link)


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